dyes and paper

Handmade paper for the Eco Arts Festival at Cape Jourimain, combining natural materials found on site

Handmade paper for the Eco Arts Festival at Cape Jourimain, combining natural materials found on site

Papermaking workshop, offered together with biology student Jesse McNichol, the public was invited to learn the process...

Paper and ink/dye making workshop, offered together with biology student Jesse McNichol, the public was invited to learn the process…

Handmade book and paper using original pages combined with natural materials

‘Made in Canada’.

Created using an out-of-circulation library book, handmade paper (from original pages), thread, natural materials (bark, grasses, berries…)

'Made in Canada'. Interior detail

‘Made in Canada’. Interior details

Tea and milk. Made using milk cartons and tea leaves

Milk and tea.  Made from milk cartons, tea leaves and white glue.

Houses. These were created using the papermaking and casting processes, out of a variety of found fibres

Houses cast from paper, grasses, seaweed, potatoes and rice.

Natural Dyes sample chart 1J1440x2044-09698

Natural dyes sample chart 1 & 2.  Made using berries, barks, earth and vegetables.

Natural Dyes Postcard Project

Natural dyes postcard project

Carriage House.  Blackberries, moss and charcoal on paper

Carriage House.  Made using blackberries, moss and charcoal on paper.

Bay of Fundy clay on masonite

From Bay of Fundy plant series, made using Fundy mud on masonite.

Natural dyes on paper

Figure drawing with natural dyes.

Natural ink/dye experiments continued…

MIXING:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Above, a chart created 12.4.2013 to test the layering and mixing of different ink/dyes made from natural materials (berries: lingon & aronia, onion skin, turmeric, beet, red cabbage, all with a bit of vinegar added)

Below the same chart a few months later on 30.8.2013 (having been up on the wall exposed to natural light)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

WET / DRY:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA Liquid dyes left out to dry

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Above, a chart with wet dyes on the left, and dried dyes on the right (similar to using dried cakes of watercolours), which I had in mind might be more portable than their liquid counterparts

Below, the same chart after a few months (having been left out in the sunlight)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

‘RAW’ / ‘COOKED’:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Some of these dyes involved heat, others did not – for example above, the lower colour was made by combining turmeric with room temperature water, whereas below, the top colour was made by simmering the same solution over low heat for a short time

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And then below are the same samples a few months later

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

A landscape that was destined to fade…

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

I enjoy offering workshops in papermaking and natural ink/dye making, which I have hosted in Nova Scotia & New Brunswick, Canada and Tallinn, Estonia.

Poster for an interactive papermaking event in START Gallery

Poster for an interactive papermaking event in START Gallery

Please visit my new website at: scaldn.net

8 responses to “dyes and paper

  1. Sarah, these are so neat! I love the Carriage House in particular 🙂

  2. BEAUTIFUL!

    Nice to see the Ecoarts festival included. I’m so glad it played a part, however, small in your process.

  3. this stuff is beautiful .. i especially love the little cast houses. they are gems.

  4. Your houses and dye samples are beautiful! Have you found the inks to be colorfast?

    • Julie, thank you for your comment and question! The colours from these dye samples have faded surprisingly little since they were painted on a few years ago (where I did not add anything to make them stay) as they were packed away, not exposed to any light. In more recent dye sample sheets most of the inks have faded (or changed, e.g. turned brownish) more considerably in the past few months, as they have been exposed to natural light. Please see my post about this on the ‘upcoming/current’ page, which includes photos. I’ve actually not researched too much about how to make the colours hold, as I appreciate this process of change.

  5. Thanks for your answer, Sara I have only just begun to experiment with making inks and have much to learn. I love the element of surprise in seeing how the colors change and blend in ways I don’t expect.Thanks for putting your samples and work out there!

  6. you may make the color hold by spraying hair spray on it

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s